'Pharma Bro' Martin Shkreli Loses Appeal, Will Stay in Prison

                                                                                          Issue # 2983 | July 19th, 2019      





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News Alert



'Pharma Bro' Martin Shkreli Loses Appeal, Will Stay in Prison

Martin Shkreli - the former biopharma CEO widely known as "Pharma Bro" - lost his bid to overturn a seven-year prison sentence for fraud this week. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit affirmed Shkreli's 2017 conviction. The appeals court judges ruled against Shkreli by a 3-0 vote. In addition to ordering him to stay in prison, the judges affirmed that he must forfeit more than $7.3 million, pay restitution of $388,336 and pay a $75,000 fine. Alert readers will recall that Shkreli gained a high profile in 2015 when, as the CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, he hiked the price of the lifesaving HIV drug Daraprim by more than 5,000%. Learn More




MyoKardia Cuts All Ties to Sanofi

MyoKardia will spend up to $80 million to buy back U.S. royalty rights on mavacamten and MYK-224 from Sanofi, the last economic tie the two companies have retained since the French big pharma ended its collaboration in January. The transaction will put a dent into the cash reserves of MyoKardia, which amounted to $628 million as of March 31st. The company, which has no products on the market, says it has enough money to fund operations into the second half of 2021. MyoKardia will know soon enough whether its gamble was worth it, as the Phase 3 trial of mavacamten in obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is due to read out in the second quarter of 2020. Learn More




BioPharma Boss Calls for Ireland to Invest in Waste Management

Investing in specialist waste management facilities would strengthen Ireland's hand in attracting more foreign investment, a global pharmaceuticals chief has said. Christophe Weber said there was a "huge critical mass" of pharmaceutical manufacturing in Ireland, "so I think having its own waste capability would be a big competitive advantage for the future for Ireland". Mr Weber, who is global chief executive of Japan's largest drug company Takeda, was in Ireland for the opening of its new state-of-the-art manufacturing facility for its blockbuster cancer drug, Ninlaro. The company has invested $45 million at Grange Castle to build the plant that will manufacture the drug for global supply. Learn More

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On this Day Alert

1879  Doc Holliday Kills for the First Time


On this day in 1879, Doc Holliday committed his first murder, killing a man for shooting up his New Mexico saloon. Despite his formidable reputation as a deadly gunslinger, Doc Holliday only engaged in eight shootouts during his life, and it has only been verified that he killed two men. Learn More

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TED Alert

How to Get Empowered, Not Overpowered, by AI


Many artificial intelligence researchers expect AI to outsmart humans at all tasks and jobs within decades, enabling a future where we're restricted only by the laws of physics, not the limits of our intelligence. MIT physicist and AI researcher Max Tegmark separates the real opportunities and threats from the myths, describing the concrete steps we should take today to ensure that AI ends up being the best -- rather than worst -- thing to ever happen to humanity. Learn More

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Are recent record-breaking heatwaves around the world being caused by global warming?


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Bioprocess Alert

Aseptic Gowning for the Cleanroom


This video, which has 165,000+ views, provides a narrated demonstration of proper procedure for cleanroom gowning in bioprocessing.