Sanofi Genzyme Seeking 400,000 Sq. Ft. of Lab and Office Space in Cambridge, MA

                                                                                          Issue # 2793 | October 16th, 2018      











































































































































































































News Alert



Sanofi Genzyme Seeking 400,000 Sq. Ft. of Lab and Office Space in Cambridge, MA

Sanofi Genzyme is planning a major expansion in East Cambridge, the latest in a line of life sciences heavyweights to grow in the booming neighborhood. Real estate industry brokers say the company has been looking for about 400,000 square feet of office and lab space - enough to house around 2,000 employees - and is reportedly zeroing in on Cambridge Crossing, the 45-acre former rail yard being redeveloped north of the Lechmere Green Line MBTA station. It is not clear if a deal has been reached. Neither Sanofi nor Cambridge Crossing developer DivcoWest would comment, and several people with knowledge of the search offered conflicting accounts on whether a formal agreement has been signed. Learn More




Roche and SQZ Expand R&D Partnership

Roche and SQZ have made public an expansion of their R&D partnership that will look to develop new cancer drugs. Under the terms of the expanded partnership, SQZ stands to receive up to $125 million in "upfront and near-term" milestone payments, though the companies have declined to specify how much of that SQZ is receiving at the start. The deal is being touted as worth up to $1 billion in the years to come if clearly defined milestones are met. Alert readers will recall that Roche's original partnership with SQZ began three year ago when Roche selected SQZ's technology to assist it with new drug development. Learn More




Trump Administration Wants BioPharma to Include Drug Prices in Ads

The Trump administration wants biopharma companies to include the list price of drugs in television advertisements. The Department of Health and Human Services released a  proposed regulation this week  that, if finalized, would require companies that sell drugs covered by Medicare or Medicaid to put a standard price in their ads, if the price is larger than $35 per month. HHS Secretary Alex Azar suggested the policy change would help bring down drug prices. The former drug company executive has come under criticism for promoting policies that focus on other parts of the pharmaceutical supply chain while leaving his former employers unscathed.  Learn More

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TED Alert

How to Seek Truth in the Era of Fake News


Known worldwide for her courage and clarity, Christiane Amanpour has spent the past three decades interviewing business, cultural and political leaders who have shaped history. In conversation with TED Curator Chris Anderson, Amanpour discusses fake news, objectivity in journalism, the leadership vacuum in global politics and more, sharing her wisdom along the way. "Be careful where you get information from," she says. "Unless we are all engaged as global citizens who appreciate the truth, who understand science, empirical evidence and facts, then we are going to be wandering around -- to a potential catastrophe." Learn More

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Have you heard about social media bots?
 


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Bioprocess Alert

When & Where to Use Reusable/Disposable pH Probes


This video, part 2 of 3, discusses the use of reusable versus disposable pH probes.

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In-Line Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy as a Versatile Process Analytical Technology for Preparative Protein Chromatography
 
Webinar - Tuesday , October 16th, 2018

The Best of BIOT awards are BIOT's annual recognition of excellent presentations given at the spring ACS National Meeting. The winners are selected based on audience and session chair voting. Each recipient is invited to give a webinar reprising the original presentation. 

In an effort to promote scientific discourse and connectivity throughout the BIOT community, this year, the webinars are provided free of charge. 


Resource Alert



Bioprocessing of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Their Derivatives: Toward Cell-Free Therapeutics

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted tremendous research interest due to their ability to repair tissues and reduce inflammation when implanted into a damaged or diseased site. These therapeutic effects have been largely attributed to the collection of biomolecules they secrete (i.e., their secretome). Recent studies have provided evidence that similar effects may be produced by utilizing only the secretome fraction containing extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs are cell-derived, membrane-bound vesicles that contain various biomolecules. Due to their small size and relative mobility, they provide a stable mechanism to deliver biomolecules throughout an organism. Learn More

 
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Regulatory Alert



Differences Between HHS and FDA Clinical Trial Rules Spark New Guidance

With an eye to reducing confusion between the revised Common Rule from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) regulations, the FDA has issued a new guidance to help researchers comply with the two different sets of human subject protection regulations. The six-page guidance focuses on informed consent, expedited review procedures and institutional review board (IRB) continuing review. According to the FDA, the purposes of the Common Rule are to promote uniformity, understanding and compliance with human subject protections and to create a uniform body of regulations across the federal departments and agencies.
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Discovery Alert



CRISPR Cures Inherited Disorder in Mice, Paving Way for Genetic Therapy Before Birth

Scientists have reported this week that they used the genome editing technique CRISPR to alter the DNA of laboratory mice in the womb, eliminating an often-fatal liver disease before the animals had even been born. The research, by a team at the University of Pennsylvania and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), is a very early proof of concept. But while CRISPRing human fetuses is years away, at best, the success in mice bolsters what Dr. William Peranteau, who co-led the study, calls his dream of curing genetic diseases before birth.  Learn More

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Complete Biopharmaceuticals Plant Available